Tech

Livers for transplant can now be kept alive at body temperature

Now for a bit of metra-analysis WHEN Constantin Coussios, a biomedical engineer at Oxford University, arrived one day in 2013 at the transplant centre of King’s College Hospital, in London, with a liver for their use, he triggered a brief flurry of panic. Two other livers had arrived at the same time. The hospital had only one operating theatre in ...

Read More »

Sequencing the world

IN NOVEMBER 2015, 23 of biology’s bigwigs met up at the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, DC, to plot a grandiose scheme. It had been 12 years since the publication of the complete genetic sequence of Homo sapiens. Other organisms’ genomes had been deciphered in the intervening period but the projects doing so had a piecemeal feel to them. Some were predictable ...

Read More »

Making multicopters easier to use will increase the number in use

SMALL multicopter drones—souped-up versions of those sold by the million as Christmas toys—have tremendous potential for use in industry and agriculture. Rather than erecting scaffolding or bringing in a mechanical platform to inspect things like roofs and chimneys, the job can be done instantly, and probably for less money, by sending up a drone-mounted camera. Drones can also fly along ...

Read More »

Thicker eggshells help cuckoos hatch earlier than their nestmates

THE exhausting chore of raising young is one a few birds manage to avoid. By laying their eggs in the nests of others, they dupe those others into feeding their nestlings. Such brood parasitism has arisen independently at least three times, in the groups known as cuckoos, cowbirds and honeyguides. That gives biologists a tool with which to explore the ...

Read More »

The biggest rocket in the world prepares for its maiden voyage

TECHNOLOGICAL progress is not always straightforward. Before Concorde’s first commercial flight in 1976 supersonic passenger-travel was science fiction. Since that aircraft’s last hurrah, in 2003, it has become historical fiction instead. Similarly with rockets, the most powerful built (almost five times more powerful than anything flying today) was the Saturn V, which carried human beings to the moon. It last ...

Read More »

Are programs better than people at predicting reoffending?

IN AMERICA, computers have been used to assist bail and sentencing decisions for many years. Their proponents argue that the rigorous logic of an algorithm, trained with a vast amount of data, can make judgments about whether a convict will reoffend that are unclouded by human bias. Two researchers have now put one such program, COMPAS, to the test. According ...

Read More »

Fundamental physics is frustrating physicists

DEEP in a disused zinc mine in Japan, 50,000 tonnes of purified water held in a vast cylindrical stainless-steel tank are quietly killing theories long cherished by physicists. Since 1996, the photomultiplier-tube detectors (pictured above) at Super-Kamiokande, an experiment under way a kilometre beneath Mount Ikeno, near Hida, have been looking for signs that one of the decillion (1033) or ...

Read More »